Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Open Access
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 2  275  55
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Inferring floodplain bathymetry using inundation frequency
    (2020) ;
    Emadzadeh, Adel
    ;
    Enner, Alcantara
    ;
    Yang, Xiangyu
    ;
    Ho, Huu Loc
    This study proposes a new method to retrieve the bathymetry of turbid-water floodplains from the inundation frequency (IF) data derived from over 32 years of composite optical remote sensing data. The new method was tested and validated over the Curuai floodplain in the lower Amazon River, where the entire bathymetry was surveyed in 2004, and water level gauge data has been available since 1960. The depth was estimated based on the relationship derived from IF and surveyed depth data, and the results were compared to those retrieved from bare-Earth DEM. We further assessed the sensitivity of the approach by analyzing the deepest part of the lake (i. e., permanent water body ~ 8m) with high IF, as well as the effect of gradual sedimentation in the lake over time. The results showed that the model is highly accurate and sensitive to IF changes even in the permanent water body areas, suggesting that this model can be used in other seasonal lakes worldwide with turbid-waters, where large-scale bathymetry surveys are not feasible due to high operation costs.
    WOS© Citations 7Scopus© Citations 8  271  107
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Source-to-sink sediment fluxes and budget in the Chao Phraya River, Thailand: A multi-scale analysis based on the national dataset
    (2020) ;
    Lim, Jana
    ;
    Ho, Huu Loc
    ;
    Herrin, Jason
    ;
    Chitwatkulsiri, Detchphol
    In this paper, we provide a holistic view of the hydro-sedimentological regimes of the Chao Phraya River (CPR) Basin, the fifth largest basin in Southeast Asia. Our analysis of daily discharge and sediment data from 42 major gauge stations showed high seasonal variation in the suspended sediment discharge (Qs), with the maximum discharge occurring in October on an inter-annual average. At Nakhon Sawan, the river discharges 304x104 tons of sediment every year, 60% of which is transported in the peak flooding months (September to November). The peak sediment discharge in October is dramatically attenuated at a station 150 km downstream from Nakhon Sawan, mainly due to discharge diversion to irrigation canals, distributaries, and branches, as well as seasonal flooding over the Central Plain. Sediment yield (SY) calculated at major stations showed spatial variability across the basin, generally decreasing in a downstream direction (i.e. as drainage area increases) (R2 = 0.55). Some stations in the upper basin’s watersheds showed SY as high as >700 tons/km2/yr, which is comparable to upstream catchments of other large rivers with high sediment production. Two significant sediment sinks were identified in this study: the Bhumibol and Sirikit dams (each on Ping and Nan Rivers) – which trap ~236 × 104 tons of sediment each year (~90% trapping rate) – as well as the floodplain of the CPR which stores 176 × 104 tons annually along the 150 km downstream reach from Nakhon Sawan (~60% of Qs at Nakhon Sawan). By extrapolating the floodplain sediment budget, we estimate that around 300 × 104 tons/yr of suspended sediment can be stored downstream of Nakhon Sawan (to the Gulf); comparable to the total annual storage of the two mega dams upstream. Although these dams have been previously reported to cause substantial sediment starvation in the CPR Delta, this study is the first to recognize the important role of lowland storage on the CPR’s basin’s sediment discharge to the Gulf of Thailand, and how it contributes a similar degree of threat to the shrinking delta.
    WOS© Citations 16Scopus© Citations 22  114  121