Now showing 1 - 10 of 20
  • Publication
    Open Access
      444  195
  • Publication
    Restricted
    A critical review of the Tamil language syllabus and recommendations for syllabus revisions
    (2006-09) ; ;
    Gopinathan, Saravanan
    ;
    Saravanan, Vanithamani
    This project examines the extent that the current syllabus for Tamil includes different varieties of both spoken and written Tamil, and asks how it can be revised with the concerns of the community for the longevity of the Tamil language in Singapore in mind. The project uses a focus group-based methodology to address these research questions. In addition, the ideas of three main consultants were sought. Based on this data, a number of recommendations for syllabus revision and a curriculum of the future are tabled in this paper, including the use of a Standard Spoken Tamil, especially at the lower primary level; and a revision of the weighting for spoken and written Tamil in the curriculum.
      532  146
  • Publication
    Open Access
      68  55
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Language and social class: Linguistic capital in Singapore
    (2008-03) ;
    Tan, Teck Kiang
    This paper analyzes the relationship between ethnic group, language use and social class in Singapore in light of implications for performance in the national school system. Using a Bourdieusian theoretical framework we argue that though Singapore equitably distributes the linguistic capital of English through its bilingual language in education policy, children from low income homes are disadvantaged. For the Chinese and Malay ethnic groups there is a correlation between dominant home language and social class though this is not the case for the Indians. Correspondence analysis shows that SES is correlated to English test scores. Multilevel analysis shows that SES is related to aspects of linguistic capital like language choice in reading, watching TV, choosing types of friends and learning about religion. Data for these claims come from The Sociolinguistic Survey of Singapore 2006 (SSS 2006).
      1983  16757
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The sociolinguistic survey of Singapore 2006: Findings and policy implications
    (2009) ;
    Aisha Jamaludeen
    ;
    Mardiana Roslan
    This survey of language use and users in Singapore sought to find out who speaks what language, to whom, in what context, with what attitude, with what level of fluency, and to what end. This project surveyed 716 students from the Primary 5 cohort of Singapore schools, randomly selected on the basis of ethnic group (i.e., Chinese, Malay and Indian) and socioeconomic status, using a bilingual survey instrument. In its qualitative phase, follow-up studies were conducted with 12 participants who were randomly selected from the three ethnic groups, across a broad spectrum of social classes.
      355  335
  • Publication
    Open Access
      140  148
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Globalization and multilingualism in Singapore: Implications for a hybrid identity
    (2006-04)
    This essay is about language and unique forms of identity in Singapore resulting from globalization. Specifically it looks at language use amongst the Indians in Singapore in the domains of religion and public space. Identified as one of the most globalized nations in the world, Singapore is concerned about the erosion of mother tongue languages and the consequent demise of Asian Values. Through the preliminary findings of a large scale language survey and smaller scale follow up studies, this essay shows a heteroglossic use of languages and a concomitant hybrid identity which is the mark of being Singaporean. The essay also emphasizes that a unidimensional view of language and globalization, which only looks at globalization as a form of McDonaldization, is not in keeping with actual patterns of language use.
      915  11551
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multimodal literacy in English language and literature teaching: The design, implementation and evaluation of a one-to-one wireless laptop programme in a Singapore high school
    (2011)
    Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander)
    ;
    Wan Fareed Mohammed Yusof
    ;
    This project investigated what happens in English Language and Literature learning when every student has a laptop computer to use in school and at home. The data were collected from teachers, students and school administrators in a series of questionnaires, classroom observations, meetings, focus group discussions, informal conversations, and interviews. Findings revealed a complex web of relationships between the stakeholders that translated into an uneven picture of professional practice in the laptop initiative. Whereas teachers opted for direct and traditional instructional methods, a fine-grained analysis showed that students were able, on occasions, to create meanings using a range of representational modes. Overall, the study highlighted the need to further build teachers’ capabilities in multimodality, knowledge creation, and the design of student-centred learning.
      242  149
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A study of Singapore's Learning Support Programme: Educating from the heart
    This research project, which takes a sociocultural approach to the investigation of language and literacy, is a baseline study of pedagogy in Singapore's Learning Support Programme (LSP). The LSP is an early intervention programme for children with weak reading skills in English. The main aim of the project was to investigate how Learning Support Co-ordinators (LSCs) teach low-track students. Data includes a survey of LSCs, interviews with teachers and focal students, and video footage of classrooms from five schools. The findings reported here focus on questioning patterns of teachers and students, teachers' beliefs about bilingualism, level of student engagement, allocation of whole language versus code-based skills in the classroom, and interactional patterns in the classroom.
      376  194
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Bilingualism, literacy and reading achievement
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2014) ;
    Yin, Bin
    ;
    Li, Li
    ;
    Zhang, Dongbo
    ;
    Chin, Chern Far
    ;
    Zhao, Shouhui
    ;
    Bilingualism is becoming more common worldwide, and it remains a central educational policy in Singapore. In this document, we review research related to bilingualism and literacy development and achievement. Following an ecological framework, we outline known factors contributing to literacy achievement and discuss findings from bilingual research regarding these factors. We conclude with recommendations for educational practice informed by the research literature.
      510  687