Now showing 1 - 10 of 56
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Supporting field study with personalized project spaces in a geographical digital library
    (2004-12)
    Lim, Ee Peng
    ;
    Sun, Aixin
    ;
    Liu, Zehua
    ;
    Hedberg, John G.
    ;
    ;
    Teh, Tiong Sa
    ;
    Goh, Dion Hoe Lian
    ;
    Theng, Yin Leng
    Digital libraries have been rather successful in supporting learning activities by providing learners with access to information and knowledge. However, this level of support is passive to learners and interactive and collaborative learning cannot be easily achieved. In this paper, we study how digital libraries could be extended to serve a more active role in collaborative learning activities. We focus on developing new services to support a common type of learning activity, field study, in a geospatial context. We propose the concept of personal project space that allows individuals to work in their personalized environment with a mix of private and public data and at the same time to share part of the data with team members. To support the portability of the resources in our digital library, the selected resources can be exported in an organized manner.
      343  486
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The role of Digital Libraries in teaching and learning geography
    (2004-11) ;
    Hedberg, John G.
    ;
    Teh, Tiong Sa
    ;
    Lim, Ee Peng
    ;
    Goh, Dion Hoe Lian
    ;
    Theng, Yin Leng
    Adopting a problem-centred approach helps students to learn Geography more effectively as they are able to identify and generalize about where different resources or activities are spatially located and they learn to associate certain patterns and processes with geographical changes. In an era where web-based student-centred inquiry is gaining popularity as a mode of learning Geography, the role of digital libraries as delivery trucks (in Clark’s terminology, 1983) needs to be better understood. An obvious affordance of the digital library is that it organizes information around themes for problems to be solved. This paper describes a developmental project to build a digital library for Geographical assets. This digital library (G-Portal) serves an active role in collaborative learning activity in which students conduct a field study of an environmental problem, within a geospatial context – in this case, beach erosion and sea level rise. G-Portal not only functions as a digital library of information resources, it also provides manipulation and analytical tools that can operate on the information provided. This study examined two specific case studies as part of a larger study which explored the possible the ways the students can use the G-portal find information, create learning artefacts, construct arguments and explore their awarness of the modality of information sources and in the learning artefacts they created. G-portal was sucessful in providing resources which supported the students in finding information and supporting multimodality in the construction their artefacts.
      350  4390
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Personalized project space for managing metadata of geography learning objects
    (2005-06)
    Zong, Wenbo
    ;
    Wu, Dan
    ;
    Sun, Aixin
    ;
    Lim, Ee Peng
    ;
    Goh, Dion Hoe Lian
    ;
    Theng, Yin Leng
    ;
    Hedberg, John G.
    ;
      298  3757
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The relationship between height to width ratios and the heat island intensity at 22:00 h for Singapore
    (1999) ;
    Goh, Kim Chuan
    The statistical relationship between urban canyon height-to-width (H/W) ratios and nocturnal heat island intensities for public housing estates in Singapore has been examined. Although a number of similar studies have been conducted for temperate cities, this is a first attempt at correlating H/W to heat island intensities for a tropical city. Heat island intensities were examined specifically at 22:00 h because a previous study of Singapore's heat island determined that the heat islands were well developed by that time. A total of 17 Housing Development Board (HDB) estates were studied and at least two vehicle traverses were conducted for each estate on nights with a few days of antecedent dry weather conditions. H/W ratios for each estate were tabulated by proportion of building length. The statistical analysis demonstrates that there is a positive relationship between the heat island intensities and the median H/W, such that ΔTu−r(max)=0.952 (median H/W)−0.021, statistically significant at α=0.05 with a p-value of 0.001 and a correlation coefficient of 0.53. Copyright © 1999 Royal Meteorological Society
      242  921
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The impact of global warming on storms and storm preparedness in Southeast Asia
    According to the latest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), "[w]arming of the climate system is unequivocal, as is now evident from observations of increases in global average air and ocean temperatures" (IPCC, 2007: 5) by about 0.8–1.0°C over the last 160 years. Based on a survey of literature on global warming and precipitation, there is agreement that the frequency of extreme precipitation events in Southeast Asia will increase with global warming. At the regional level, densely populated countries in Southeast Asia are vulnerable to these changes in precipitation events. This article provides a review of the potential changes to storm events in Southeast Asia, based on the understanding of existing scientific discourse. The article also presents two case studies of anomalous storm event in Southeast Asia, Typhoon Vamei and the extreme high rainfall event in December 2006 in Peninsular Malaysia, as indication of the potential impacts of global warming related changes to storm activities, highlighting the need for preparedness in adapting to the impact of global warming.
      213  440
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Geography students in Singapore engaged in an internet constructivist learning task: an activity system perspective
    We often assume that when we engage a student in a constructivist learning activity on the internet, the student will be more motivated, learn more effectively and attain higher-order learning outcomes. However, little empirical research exists to confirm these assumptions. The central research question of this study was to explore what happens when a student is engaged in constructivist learning in a small group using resources from the web. Within the framework of an activity system, this study investigated how the student (subject) interacted with the web (tools) in the learning process (production) to generate the observed learning outcomes (object). This involved the views of teachers as stakeholders (community) and the way the students worked in a group (division of labour). Concepts from existing studies such as Borgman et al. (1990) and Kuhlthau’s (1993) study of information-seeking behaviour were used to explore some of these elements in the activity system conceptual framework. In essence, a Creswell (1998) and Guba and Lincoln (1989) adaptation of the Wolcott (1983) conception of a quasi-ethnography was used as the qualitative methodology for this study. In general, the results indicated that the students may be more motivated by assessment marks than the use of the internet. Students also felt that searching for information on the internet was frustrating, especially when information was in non-summarised and non-extracted forms and thus preferred to simply receive information from the teacher. The information-seeking behaviours noted were largely in the starting and chaining categories in Ellis’ (1995) terminology. Although some higher-order learning outcomes such as attitude and evaluation were present, the students were proficient with simply reproducing facts. The students also felt that working in a group was difficult which possibly indicated a lack of experience with working in groups. Time constraint to meet was a reason cited by the students that has hampered their learning together. The teachers also felt that such an activity was limited in its effectiveness and rather impractical as curriculum time is limited. Amidst the rather unpromising results arising from using the internet in this learning activity, the findings do provide useful information on how future constructivist learning activities, such as the use of WebQuests (Dodge, 1997), can be designed.
      199  24
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Is Singapore’s school geography relevant to our changing world?
    How school geography should be taught has been a longstanding issue for geography educators. In some countries, state or national level curriculum predicates how the subject should be taught in schools. This paper examines these questions in relation to existing frameworks of conceptualizing school geography, such as the International Charter on Geographical Education. School geography in Singapore has evolved from regional geography to thematic geography to systematic geography. A review of the curriculum in 2007 resulted in a distinct form of school geography unprecedented in Singapore’s education history. Today, school geography in Singapore is learnt conceptually with national level assessment designed to that end. To what extent is this evolution in curriculum design in step with changes in our world? In response to the changes in school geography, pre-service and in-service teacher training has also responded by focusing on conceptual learning and inquiry. This paper will explore the state of school geography curricula in Singapore today, and the curriculum of teacher training, with the intent to critically discuss the state of geography education in Singapore. Although geography has remained a disciplinary subject whose place has yet been disputed, the big question of why study geography in the first place needs to be answered to ensure its continued survival. In particular, school geography will be examined for its relevance to a fast changing world. This critique ends by offering a reason to how geography plays an important role in education for sustainable development, and its relevance to Singaporeans or even any citizen of the world.
      177  430
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning with G-Portal: a geographic digital library
    (2005)
    Hedberg, John G.
    ;
    ;
    Lim, Ee Peng
    ;
    Chatterjea, Kalyani
    ;
    Goh, Dion Hoe Lian
    ;
    Theng, Yin Leng
    ;
    Teh, Tiong Sa
    Students learn Geographical concepts more effectively if they can identify and generalize about where different resources or activities are spatially located and when they associate certain patterns and processes with geographical changes. Digital libraries can be used to support web-based student-centred inquiry as a mode of learning Geography. This study explores the affordances of a geographical digital repository (the G-Portal) which organizes information around problem tasks. Two phases of the project were to build a digital library for Geographical assets and to develop a place-name assignment algorithm which automatically determines the names of places embedded in web pages referenced by these assets so as to augment them with the appropriate location semantics. This G-Portal digital library serves an active role in collaborative learning activities in which students conduct a virtual field study of an environmental problem, within a geospatial context – in this case, beach erosion and sea level rise. GPortal also provides manipulation and analytical tools that can operate on the information retrieved.
      157  210
  • Publication
    Open Access
    ‘The hole in the sky causes global warming’: A case study of secondary school students’ climate change alternative conceptions
    (2015) ;
    Pascua, Liberty
    This study identified secondary school students’ alternative conceptions (ACs) of climate change and their resistance to instruction. Using a case-based approach, a diagnostic test was administered to Secondary 3 male students in a pre-test and post-test. The ACs identified in the pre-test were on the causes of climate change, the natural greenhouse effect and its properties, the enhancement of the greenhouse effect, the elements involved in heat-trapping and their characteristics. There were also notable ACs on the effects of climate change, mostly on how the phenomenon is related to non-atmospheric events such as tsunami, earthquakes, acid rain and skin cancer. The students confuse the Montreal with the Kyoto Protocol as the primary treaty aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions. Whereas there was significant improvement in students’ understanding in the post-test, the distribution of responses for each of the ACs showed that the reduction in erroneous responses was not sufficient to reject the ACs fully. The authors recommend that instruction should move beyond patchwork pedagogy to a more explicit acknowledgement, incorporation and direct refutation of misconceived knowledge structures.
      198  347