Now showing 1 - 10 of 16
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Parents’ rating and teachers’ rating on young children’s development: Agreements and discrepancies
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022)
    Xie, Huichao
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Chui, Mae Wong
    ;
    Koh, Hwan Cui
    ;
    Daniel, Lourdes Mary
    ;
    Pratibha Keshav Agarwal
      66  74
  • Publication
    Open Access
      105  82
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Effect of partner reauditorization on young adults' attitudes toward a child who communicated using nonelectronic augmentative and alternative communication
    (2021)
    Hyppa-Martin, Jolene
    ;
    ;
    Janka, Emily
    ;
    Halverson, Natalie
    This study examined whether partner reauditorization affected the attitudes reported by young adults toward a child who communicated using nonelectronic AAC. The study also examined preferences for the way the AAC system was used (i.e., in the presence or absence of reauditorization), whether reauditorization was associated with differences in perceptions about the social interactions with the child, and ease of understanding the child’s aided messages. For the study, 84 young adults viewed (a) one video of a child who communicated using nonelectronic AAC in which the child’s communication partner reauditorized the child’s aided message, and (b) a second video in which the message was not reauditorized. Participants answered survey questions designed to measure dependent variables including attitudes, ease of understanding, perceptions about the child’s social interactions, and preferences regarding reauditorization. Attitudes toward the child were more positive when reauditorization was implemented. Partner reauditorization may play a role in improving attitudes that individuals hold about a child who uses nonelectronic AAC and may also contribute to the ease of understanding an aided message.
    WOS© Citations 1  42Scopus© Citations 1
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Development and psychometric properties of a culturally adapted video version of strange stories as a measure of advanced theory of mind in youths
    This study described the development of a culturally adapted video version of Strange Stories test as a measure of advanced theory of mind for youths in an Asian country (i.e. Singapore), the Y-ToM, and to provide preliminary psychometric properties. Participants were 170 youths (82 male, 88 female) aged from 13 to 16 years old (M = 14.77, SD = 1.16) in Singapore. The youths completed the Y-ToM, an abbreviated IQ test and the Happé’s Strange Stories in a counterbalanced order while their parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). A two-factor structure consisting of social and physical subscales was suggested. Concurrent, convergent, divergent and diagnostic validity of the Y-ToM was examined. Internal consistency of the Y-ToM social subscale was acceptable though it was not satisfactory for the Y-ToM physical subscale. Inter-rater reliability was good while test-retest reliability was lower.
      77  89
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Supporting individuals with autism spectrum disorder in Singapore
    It has been reported that there is a rise in the number of individuals being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in Singapore along with evolving changes in public awareness, attitudes, and levels of financial support occurring in the field in recent years. As such, this column presents the current status and issues related to the identification, provision of early intervention services, education, and transition into youth/adults for individuals with ASD in Singapore. Additional needs and future recommendations are also included.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 4  129  1604
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Evaluating acquisition, preference and discrimination in requesting skills between picture exchange and iPad®-based speech generating device across preschoolers
    (2021)
    Yong, Yvonne Hui Lin
    ;
    ; ;
    Yeong, Adeline Mun Yan
    This study compared a picture exchange (PE) system and an iPad®-based speech generating device (SGD) when teaching requesting skills to preschoolers with developmental disabilities and limited functional speech. A multiple baseline design with counterbalancing the order of two instruction conditions across participants was applied to compare the acquisition rate, followed by a concurrent operant arrangement to examine participants’ preference for these two augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Discrimination of two picture symbols presented via the priority AAC system was also probed using a concurrent operant arrangement. Results indicated that two of three participants required less sessions to reach mastery for the iPad®-based instruction condition. All participants showed a clear preference for the iPad®-based SGD and were able to discriminate between two picture symbols presented simultaneously on the iPad®-based SGD when making requests. This study highlights practice implications in terms of describing a systematic approach that could be employed when identifying a priority AAC system for learners with developmental disabilities and limited functional speech.
    WOS© Citations 3Scopus© Citations 1  297  233
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Will the future BE POSITIVE? How early life parenting signals the developing "pre" school brain
    (2019) ; ; ;
    Tsotsi, Stella
    ;
    ;
    Kwok, Fu Yu
    ;
    ;
    Xie, Huichao
    ;
    ; ;
    Ng, Chee Chin
    ;
    Hu, Pei Lin
    ;
    Tan, Ngiap Chuan
    We suggest that prior to school entry, our earliest “teachers” and “learning settings” —that is, our parents, caregivers, and homes—provide signals about our environmental conditions. In turn, our brains may interpret this information as cues indicating the types of environments we will likely face and adapt accordingly. We discuss ways in which two such early-life cues—bilingual exposure and sensitive caregiving quality, influence “domain general” neurocircuitry and associated functioning (e.g., temperament and emotional reactivity, emotion regulation, relational memory, exploratory play, and executive functioning), as well as pre-academic outcomes. We conclude by discussing the need for early upstream intervention programmes, as well as the need for additional research including our upcoming “BE POSITIVE” study, designed to help bridge the gap between the community, home, and school environments.
      299  65Scopus© Citations 1
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Reducing perseverative requesting and other problem behavior in a young girl with autism: A sequentially implemented intervention package
    (2022) ;
    Kreibich, Shelley
    Purpose This study aims to use a sequentially implemented intervention package to reduce the occurrence of perseverative requesting and other problem behavior in a young girl with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Design/methodology/approach In this single-case study, subsequent to a functional analysis and a preference assessment, an intervention package consisting of three components (i.e. a tolerance for delay to reinforcement, choice-making and visual schedule) was implemented sequentially to address perseverative requesting and other problem behavior maintained by access to preferred items/activities in a young girl with ASD. Findings Via the intervention package, the girl demonstrated higher self-control skills (i.e. delaying access to preferred items/activities, choosing more preferred items/activities with delayed access over less preferred ones with immediate access, completing tasks before having access to preferred items/activities) with a reduction of perseverative requesting or other problem behavior. Originality/value The current case study presents concrete steps that could be applied to address tangible-maintained perseverative requesting using more natural and educationally relevant signals while improving the child’s appropriate skills (e.g. delay to reinforcement, self-control and task engagement).
      128  344
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Cross-cultural considerations for adapting valid psychoeducational assessments
    (Springer, 2022) ;
    Accurate measurement of children’s understanding and learning is essential for educational practice – in order to identify individual needs, evaluate pedagogical effects, and ultimately inform broader education policy. Much research and practice in child learning and development is predicated on accurate measurement. However, most common measurement instruments (tests, surveys) have been developed and validated in Western contexts. While these measures may be broadly appropriate for use in Singapore, they may not exhibit the same measurement properties and validity as reported in other contexts and may require modification. This chapter will thus focus on the need for locally validated and culturally appropriate measures in Singapore and the factors that may influence the development and adaptation of such measures. Specifically, this chapter will consider how the unique context of Singapore differs from Western contexts and how these contextual factors relate to and can inform the adaptation and use of different types of measurement instruments: self- and other-report inventories, norm-referenced standardised tests, and computerised adaptive tests (CATs). For example, norm-referenced measures which seek to compare a child to his or her peers require a valid frame of reference which is not necessarily provided by internationally standardised and normed measures, while CATs allow for more individualised and efficient testing experiences. In summary, this chapter will use concrete examples of test adaptation and development as well as evaluations of the measurement properties of internationally validated measures to highlight issues regarding cross-cultural measurement in the context of childhood development in Singapore. Implications for practitioners will be highlighted.
      73
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teaching a child with autism to request help only when needed
    (2022) ;
    Kreibich, Shelley
    ;
    Hyppa-Martin, Jolene
    Purpose Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other developmental disabilities are often reported to have challenges in well generalizing the newly learned communicative skills such as requesting help. Not requesting help when it is needed can hinder engagement and learning, whereas requesting help could also be socially inappropriate. This paper aims to offer a demonstration of applying general case instruction to teach a young child diagnosed with ASD to request help only when needed while concurrently increasing the child’s independence in task completion. Design/methodology/approach The demonstration adopted within-participant AB designs for one 5-year-old boy with ASD, with data collected across three tasks targeted for intervention and the other three tasks targeted for generalization probes throughout both the baseline and intervention phases. Dependent measures consisted of independent help request and independent task completion. Visual analysis was used to describe the results. Findings Results showed that the child with ASD learned to ask for help on difficult educational activities, while concurrently increasing his independence on these tasks; generalized the skill of requesting help by asking for help when he encountered other challenging novel tasks; and independently completed easy educational activities without requesting help. Originality/value The findings from this study may add to the limited literature that explored the generalization performance across tasks/activities in young learners with ASD, while demonstrating the feasibility of designing and applying general case instruction framework to enhance generalization performance for one individual learner.
    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  293  53