Now showing 1 - 10 of 49
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Metacognition & mathematical problem solving: Teaching and learning at the primary levels (MetaMaps (Primary))
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2024)

    Metacognition is a feature of Singapore’s Problem-Solving Mathematics Curriculum for more than twenty years, but there has limited formal effort to examine its impact in the mathematics classrooms from both the teaching and learning perspectives. Given the research which links metacognition strongly to success in problem solving and the role which metacognition plays in preparing our students for the 21st Century, this project aims to take on this role with an intention to better develop a plan to prepare primary mathematics teacher in addressing metacognition in the primary mathematics classrooms.

    The objectives of the exploratory project is to develop preliminary teacher conceptions of metacognition and metacognitive instructional practices grounded based on the phenomenon under observation. The project is based on some initial findings as well as theoretical constructs and framework carried out by a doctoral study, one school-based curriculum development project and an in-service course on metacognition for mathematics teachers:

    (a) Doctoral Studies – Lee, N. H. (2008). Enhancing mathematical learning and achievement of secondary one normal (academic) students using metacognitive strategies. Unpublished PhD thesis, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    (b) School-Based Curriculum Development Project – Lee, N.H., Yeo, D.J.S., & Hong, S.E. (2014). A metacognitive-based instruction for Primary Four students to approach non-routine mathematical word problems. ZDM - The International Journal on Mathematics Education, 46(3), 465-480.
    (c) Inservice Course – IME 2055: Metacognition in the mathematics classroom (conducted once a year by Lee, N.H. since July 2009).

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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Developing employability skills through SEL competency training
    (2008-11)
    Chang, Agnes Shook Cheong
    ;
    Ee, Jessie
    ;
    Based on a research study of multinational companies in some countries, Brown (2003) stated many CEOs are still in a "war for talents" because few people have "employability" - a quality reflecting one’s self-reliance, personal drive and interpersonal skills. According to Kathleen Cotton, there are 3 components in Employability Skills: Basic Skills, Higher Order Thinking Skills and Affective Skills.
    When interviewed on the expectations of employers for the fourth public university, they expressed unanimously the need to develop soft skills in the graduates of the fourth university. SEL is currently taught to all students at all levels. Through the 5 components of SEL( Self Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, Relationship Management, Responsible Decision Making) which emphasize on self efficacy, perspective taking, appreciating diversity, respect for others, organization skills, cooperation, team work, problem solving and ethical responsibility, the communication, higher order thinking and affective skills required on employability can be fostered in students with relevant experiential learning.
      279  302
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Fulfilling inquiry-based learning in Singapore mathematics classrooms
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2021-11)
      93  778
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teaching and learning with concrete-pictorial-abstract sequence: A proposed model
    (2017)
    Chang, Suo Hui
    ;
    ;
    Koay, Phong Lee
    The Concrete-Pictorial-Abstract (C-P-A) sequence is a key instructional strategy for the development of primary mathematics concepts in Singapore. However, the way to go about teaching and learning with the C-P-A sequence is unclear. As a result, the benefits of this sequence cannot be fully capitalized. This paper aims to (1) expound from learning theories of Bruner, Dienes and Piaget, and literature on representations, how learning takes place with representations and (2) using the insights gleaned, propose how teaching with representations looks like. It concludes with segments of a series of classroom lesson plans crafted using the proposed model of teaching and learning with representations for the concept of equivalent fractions in Primary Three.
      7943  10860
  • Publication
    Unknown
      105  90
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The role of virtual manipulatives on the Concrete-Pictorial-Abstract approach in teaching primary mathematics
    (2014) ;
    Tan, Jeremy Boon Leong
    This paper reports on the work to review the key pedagogical approach advocated in Singapore Primary Mathematics Curriculum – the Concrete- Pictorial-Abstract Approach or C-P-A Approach in view of the changes brought about by technological advances. In particular, the Concrete- Virtual-Pictorial-Abstract Approach or C-V-P-A Approach is proposed to take into account the role that virtual manipulatives play in enriching the representations of mathematical concepts in the mathematics classrooms. Through a case study, the study sought to determine the possible impact of this proposed revised approach on teachers’ delivery of lessons.
      1825  9362
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A metacognitive approach in kick-starting the understanding and planning phases of mathematical problem solving
    (2015)
    Hong, Seek Eng
    ;
    ;
    Yeo, Darren Jian Sheng
    Pupils have consistently fared poorly in solving non-routine Mathematical problems and the main obstacle is in understanding problems fully and planning for an effective problem-solving approach. The present study explored the impact of a metacognitive scheme on pupils' ability to solve non-routine Mathematical problems. Using a pretest-posttest design involving 63 pupils from two intact mixed-ability Primary Four classes, pupils' findings revealed that the intervention was effective, to a small extent, in improving pupils' awareness of problems, personal control of their problem-solving behaviour and emotions as well as regulation of their own thinking. Pupils also became more confident and engaged in problem solving, and they ultimately achieved greater problem-solving success. Limitations and instructional implications were discussed.
      460  469
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A proposal for assessing mathematics thinking: A lesson learnt from the Japanese open-ended approach
    (1999-12)
    The role of assessment in informing the public and parents of the outcome of instruction has, at times, become an obstacle to assessment reforms. In Singapore, for example, the public has come to accept the norm-referenced way of reporting scores. On the other hand, assessments tools offered by researchers for the teaching of thinking are often criterion-referenced. There is, therefore, a need to provide a bridge to the two different kinds of assessment tools in order for those that promote thinking to be better received by parents and the public. This is crucial as they are also partners in the education process. The Japanese Open-Ended Approach to teaching mathematics has been developed and researched since 1971. The approach promotes critical and creative thinking within the context of mathematical problem solving. The well-developed assessment tool that has evolved from the approach reflects this emphasis on critical and creative thinking. However, as in many other cases, it is more inclined towards criterion-referencing. Based on this assessment tool, proposed by the Japanese Open-Ended Approach, this paper offers a reporting format that is aimed at helping to acquaint parents and the public with the assessment method, and, hopefully, to gain wider acceptance among them of new assessment methods to come.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teaching and assessing thinking in lower secondary science
    (2000)
    Chang, Agnes Shook Cheong
    ;
    ;
    Yeap, Ban Har
      138  157