Now showing 1 - 10 of 39
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Curriculum innovation and the nurturing of 21st century learners
    (2016)
    Tan, Liang See
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Quek, Chwee Geok
    ;
    Liew, Poh Yin
    ;
    Tan, Ban Huat
    ;
    Tan, Keith Chiu Kian
    ;
    Koh, Lauren Kar Boon
      424  230
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Sustaining research innovations in educational technology through communities of practice
    The diffusion of innovation is critical to societal progression. In the field of education, such diffusion takes on added significance because of the many stakeholders and accountabilities involved. This article presents the argument that efforts at diffusion which are designed from a top-down perspective are not sustainable over the long term because such a perspective does not sufficiently acknowledge the importance of tacit knowledge in the successful adoption and adaptation of innovations. Using examples drawn from the trialing and implementation of a suite of research innovations in the Singapore education system, the argument is made that tacit understandings of any given innovation are attained through dialogue and embodied practice within authentic contexts, and that these very contexts and opportunities for dialogue are precisely the affordances of Communities of Practice. The article draws some tentative conclusions about systems-level moves and strategies which might nurture the dialectic of theory, practice, and epistemology by leveraging existing social structures.
      100  215
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning across contexts: How students regulate their learning in an informal context
    (2011-01)
    Lim, Seo Hong
    ;
    ;
    Kim, Mi Song
    ;
    ;
    Primary school learners are often engaging in learning opportunities in both inside and outside of school contexts. To understand how these different contexts afford opportunities for metacognition and self-regulation, we follow local primary school students of elementary grades five and six. In Vygotsky's work, metacognition appears as an awareness of one's own thinking processes and the way they can be controlled and directed. For Vygotsky, metacognition and self-regulation are completely intertwined in which the latter takes the forms of control over one's attention, thoughts, and actions (Fox & Riconscente, 2008). Consequently, the understanding of these important constructs supports the understanding of human behavior, learning, and development within a broader context of all human activities. To explore the learning of metacognition and self-regulation in students' learning, we draw data from an informal context: a primary school, co-curricular activities (CCA), in bowling. Interpreting from a variety of data-collection techniques such as field observations, interviews, field notes, and video recording, the research team has been observing the bowling team's practices at least once a week since January 2010. Although the school's team comprises of more than thirty students, we targeted our observations to nine of these students. A further sub-section of two participants were selected and interviews were conducted to collect information on strategic planning, self-efficacy, and knowledge application. Moreover, artifacts such as written statements of the way their families assisted in their learning in an informal context were also collected. Preliminary findings indicate that learning in an informal context affords opportunities for metacognition and self-regulation in interesting and authentic ways. In addition, students point out that learning strategies can be used in both formal and informal contexts. The findings also illustrate the importance of linking students' development of metacognitive abilities to parental mentoring in providing a fuller understanding of their learning in both formal and informal contexts.
      228  430
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Proposing an educational scaling-and-diffusion model for inquiry-based learning designs
    Education cannot adopt the linear model of scaling used by the medical sciences. "Gold standards" cannot be replicated without considering process-in -learning & diversity, and student-variedness in classrooms. This article proposes a nuanced model of educational scaling-and-diffusion, describing the scaling (top-down supports) and diffusion efforts (bottom-up innovations from teachers and schools) in Singapore's education landscape. For educational innovations that focus on explicit knowledge, scaling is mechanistic ("roll-outs"), while inquiry-based learning designs are connoted as organic ("diffusion of innovation"). Inquiry-based learning designs focus more on process rather than content dissemination, although content and process are intertwined. Roll-outs are generally sound when disseminating content as products, and in the haste of implementation, we inherently partake in the fallacy that process abilities can likewise be taught as content.
      325  261
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Situating and contextualising professional development for sustained practice and learning in school
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Tan, Liang See
    The Ministry of Education (MOE) recognises the importance of teachers’ professional development (PD) by introducing the Teacher Growth Model (TGM). In line with TGM, our case study, Stanley School, adopts a 5 stage, school-based PD cycle. This study is situated in the third iteration of this PD cycle, focused on differentiated instruction (DI). The key components of DI are the develop students’ critical and creative thinking which relates to students’ 21st century competencies. This study aims to understand the intended conditions for professional growth and teachers’ perceptions of these conditions and ways in which PD informs enactment and sustenance of practice, as well as achieved outcomes of PD such as shifts in students’ learning and teachers’ readiness.
      264  9
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Scaling educational innovations in Singapore: The roles of policymakers, practitioners, and researchers
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2017)
    In many countries and regions, education authorities have shown interests in promoting new education initiatives or innovations. With the hefty investments, they are keen to see that their initiatives are well received by the various stakeholders, namely, national leaders, district-level leaders, school leaders, teachers, students and their parents, and can be successfully scaled and improve learning. However, are the perspectives and expectations of policymakers and practitioners with regard to education innovations and their scaling necessarily the same as those of the researchers? Some of these stakeholders may expect a linear model of scaling, i.e. innovations can be translated into ready intervention packages which can be replicated mechanically by all the practitioners and consequently uplifting learning outcomes within the nation. Others may expect extensive adaptation to be allowed for any education innovations accepted for scaling. This chapter describes an eco-logical model for scaling that allows for a productive tension due to the differences in stakeholder perspectives. Based on scaling practices and considerations that operate in Singapore, the lessons about how scaling can be advanced at the systems level, which may be relevant for school districts, regions or countries similar in size to Singapore, are drawn. The paper also attempts to distil underlying scaling principles that can provide some directions to help analyse or shape scaling strategies across a hierarchy of much larger scale levels.
      325  126
  • Publication
    Unknown
    Curriculum perspectives and leadership in innovations for the nurturing of 21st century learners.
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2019)
    Tan, Liang See
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Quek, Chwee Geok
    ;
    Khong, Beng Choo
    ;
    Koh, Lauren Kar Boon
    ;
    Tan, Keith Chiu Kian
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Measuring and nurturing teamwork competency through a computer-supported creative collaborative problem-solving programme.
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2020) ; ; ;
    Hong, Helen
    ;
    Tan, Jennifer Pei-Ling
    ;
    Tee, Yi Huan
    ;
    Dhivya Suresh
    ;
    Lek, Hsiang Hui
      249  155
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Curriculum perspectives and leadership in innovations for the nurturing of 21st century learners
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020)
    Tan, Liang See
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Quek, Chwee Geok
    ;
    Khong, Beng Choo
    ;
    Koh, Kar Boon
    ;
    Tan, Keith Chiu Kian
    In 2011, the Ministry of Education (MOE) embarked on a study of five Integrated Programme (IP) schools, and sought to find out how the IP had enabled students to achieve the intended outcomes as well as the unique characteristics of IP students. Since the study was done seven years after the IP was incepted and there was no comparison group of students in the same school that had gone through an O level programme (OP), it was difficult to attribute the outcomes to the IP. It is possible that the outcomes could be due to the quality of that IP intake or it might be that the outcomes had already been achieved in those schools prior to the IP. Since 2013, more schools have started to offer IP. This study involved four of the new schools, namely: Pawai School (PS), Istana School (IS), Marina School (MS), and Sentosa School (SS). Besides the IP, these schools also offer the O level Programme, and OP students were included as a comparison group. A fifth school, Ujong Junior College (UJC), also participated in the study as it receives students from three of the schools after Year 4.
      297  5
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Teacher inquiry about pedagogical practices: A case study of a Singapore school
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2024) ;
    Ho, Jeanne Marie Pau Yuen
    ;
    Ong, Monica Woei Ling
    ;
    Jang, Hari
    ;
    Lim, Qing
    The 21st century is an era of changes. Professional Development (PD) and teacher learning are critical. The Ministry of Education (MOE) recognises the importance of PD and introduced the Teacher Growth Model (TGM) in 2012. In line with TGM, there are efforts to promote teacher inquiry in communities. Teacher Inquiry (TI) is a systematic study of one’s teaching practice. Literature suggests that collaborative inquiry in communities promotes teacher learning and change in practice, which in turn, contributes to school improvement and effectiveness. Thus, it is useful to document how Singapore schools engage in self-improvement where teachers inquire critically by examining their assumptions about pedagogies and student learning to develop professionalism and change practices.
      6  31