Now showing 1 - 10 of 36
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Design for scalability: From a class intervention to a level intervention
    (2014)
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    ;
    ;
    Chia, Gean
    ;
    Kim, Mi Song
    ;
    ;
    Sun, Daner
    Studying teacher enactment of an innovation helps us understand the process of effective spread of a curricular innovation to teachers who have differing levels of content readiness, pedagogical orientations, and different student profiles. Towards this, we explore how different teachers in the same grade level appropriated a common science curriculum enabled by mobile technologies in their classrooms. As curriculum designs are not self-sufficient by themselves, the enactments of the teachers differ in how they leverage on students’ artifacts, how they integrate the technology into the class and in which way they interact with students in a mobile learning setting. We draw implications for the innovative curricula implementation and for teacher professional development of such innovations with the ultimate purpose of scaling and sustaining.
      480  145
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Bringing physical computing to an underserved community in an informal learning space
    (2021)
    Ker, Chin-Lee
    ;
    Bimlesh Wadhwa
    ;
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    This study investigates how underserved children in the community develop Computational Thinking skills through learning physical computing with the support from older tutor volunteers. The children learned to construct physical computing projects by learning to code the micro:bit, and using various input sensors and controlling output devices. We observed the students and their interaction with the mentors to understand how they develop their Computational Thinking skills as they construct the projects. From our findings, learning with tutors can provide the support in developing Computational Thinking skills in the children.
      92  90
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Towards using computational modeling in learning of physical computing: An observational study in Singapore schools
    (2020) ;
    Bimlesh Wadhwa
    ;
    Lim, Zhao-Xiong
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    Coding for students is no longer just constrained to software and screen-based text and graphics. Students today use programmable sensors and microprocessors to solve the problems around them. The purpose of this research is to understand how students conceptualize problems and implement solutions with physical computing. Our study is driven by the following: 1) find out what Computational Thinking (CT) competencies, specifically abstraction, decomposition and algorithmic thinking, can be developed by students and 2) to what level students develop these competencies in carrying out physical computing projects. We closely observe how 41 Grade 7 students developed solutions for problems they identify in the physical world around them. Through doing so, we explore how powerful ideas of CT play a role in a project-approach to physical computing. We believe open-ended exploration through a project-approach in physical computing should reinforce practices where CT skills can grow and flourish. Our findings show that much of students’ interaction with sensors and devices is at pre-CT level, where students simply use pre-existing code fragments or templates. As students gain skills and confidence, they can be explicitly guided to develop CT skills with new projects of their own design justifying their choices. We strongly believe that Computational Modeling (CM) could help students develop their CT skills e.g. abstraction, decomposition, and algorithmic approach much more than the minimally guided syntax driven teaching approaches.
      167  125
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Local evidence synthesis on Information & Communications Technology (ICT) in education
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ;
    Wu, Longkai
      475  376
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Towards a framework for seamless learning environments
    (2008-06) ;
    Zhang, Baohui
    ;
    So, Hyo-Jeong
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    ;
    The purpose of this study is to explore the complex nature of Singapore teachers’ beliefs about knowledge and learning and how these beliefs influence pedagogical practices in their classes. This paper presents findings from a large-scale survey study with 1806 teachers in Singapore. Data revealed that while teachers’ beliefs about pedagogies, knowledge and learning were largely consistent, they also believed and practiced both teacher-centered and learner-centered pedagogies and assessment methods.
      295  166
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Extending students’ learning spaces: Technology-supported seamless learning
    (2010-06) ; ;
    So, Hyo-Jeong
    ;
    Toh, Yancy
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    Learning is interweaved into and across students’ everyday life activities. Technology that is used to support learning should be integrated with everyday life in the same way that learning occurs in everyday life: seamlessly. Mobile technologies, with their reduced size and ease of use, provide the potential to extend students’ learning spaces and enrich the learning experiences in their daily lives where they move between locations, switch from one topic or context to another, and interact with different social groups. This paper proposes mobile technology-supported seamless learning and presents learning scenarios from our research to illustrate how learning occurs seamlessly across time and places mediated by mobile devices.
      172  820
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Transforming primary science learning via a mobilized curriculum for sustainability
    (2010-11)
    Zhang, Baohui
    ;
    ; ;
    Chia, Gean
    Over a year of time, we co-designed primary three science curriculum to integrate 1:1 mobile technology with teachers. The form teacher of the experimental class in a Singapore school enacted the curriculum as her regular teaching. This paper proposes a cyclic model of how to “mobilize” the curriculum in align with the national primary science syllabus. Preliminary results of the enactment are also presented.
      361  231
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Connecting learning spaces using mobile technology
    (2010) ; ;
    So, Hyo-Jeong
    ;
    Toh, Yancy
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    The use of mobile technology can help extend children's learning spaces and enrich the learning experiences in their everyday lives where they move from one context to another, switching locations, social groups, technologies, and topics. When students have ubiquitous access to mobile devices with full connectivity, the in-situ use of the mobile devices in different contexts may allow students to make connections to what they learn in the classroom with their daily life experiences outside the classroom. This article proposes mobile technology supported seamless learning to illustrate how learning occurs seamlessly across time and places mediated by mobile devices. The authors' approaches to nurturing a seamless learning environment are also discussed.
      270  362
  • Publication
    Unknown
    Identifying patterns in computational thinking problem solving in early primary education
    (2018)
    Boticki, Ivica
    ;
    Kovacevic, Petar
    ;
    Pivalica, Danica
    ;
    This paper presents a study on computational thinking problem solving where first grade primary students engage in five groups of computational thinking tasks. The tasks are related to curriculum topics of language, science and mathematics and are implemented in form of a web application. Throughout the five tasks groups, students complete tasks covering the computation concepts of sequence, algorithms, recognition and removal of unnecessary steps, object properties and problem tasks. The focus of the data analysis presented in this paper is on identifying the computational thinking tasks across all five task groups where students were least successful and identifying patterns of task completion done by the students. For these least successful tasks, the correct and the incorrect completion patterns were examined. The results indicate that CT tool scaffolds serve as a mechanism through which students explore problems via trial and error and come to their own creative solutions through problem exploration.
      293  238
  • Publication
    Open Access
    An anatomy of a mobilized English preposition lesson: Toward personalized learning
    (2009-11)
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    ;
    ;
    So, Hyo-Jeong
    ;
    With the proliferation of mobile computing devices by the current school generation, significant opportunities have emerged for supporting personalized learning experiences through mobile devices. In our pilot study in introducing mobilized curricula to a class, we observed an inspiring mobilized lesson that made the students moved beyond classroom activities and exploited the affordances of mobile learning to provide multiple learning pathways for elementary grade (primary) 2 students. We analyzed how the affordances of mobile computing enable personalized meaningful learning in the lesson from four aspects: (a) allowing multiple entry points and learning pathways, (b) supporting multi-modality, (c) enabling student improvisation in-situ, and (d) supporting the creation and sharing of student artifacts on the move. A key property of mobile technology that enables these affordances lies with the high degree of portability of these devices which make them non-obtrusive in the students' learning spaces. Through the analysis, we hope to inspire the m-learning field to explore further what the affordances of mobile technology can enable in order to inform the design of more effective mobilized lessons.
      370  170