Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/14698
Title: 
Authors: 
Subjects: 
Project work
Motivation
Self-determination theory
Issue Date: 
Nov-2004
Citation: 
Liu, W. C., Shanti Divaharan, Peer, J., Quek C. L., Wong, A. F. L. & Williams, M. D. (2004, November/December). Project-based learning and students’ motivation: The Singapore context. Paper presented at the AARE Conference, Melbourne, Australia.
Abstract: 
The Project work (PW) initiative was introduced by the Ministry of Education, Singapore, to provide students with the opportunities to foster collaborative learning skills, to improve both oral and written communication, to practise creative and critical thinking skills, and to develop self-directed inquiry and life-long learning skills (Ministry of Education, 1999). Although PW has been introduced for a few years, there has not been much research done in the Singapore context, especially in terms of its effect on students’ motivation. To fill the empirical gap, this study examined the extent in which PW promoted students’ intrinsic motivation, as well as satisfied students’ needs for competence, choice and relatedness. Specifically, data was collected from 7 classes of Secondary 2 students with the use of a modified version of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI, McAuley, Duncan, & Tammen, 1989) to assess students’ intrinsic motivation and their perceived choice, competence and relatedness in the PW context and in their normal mathematics or science lessons. Comparisons were made to establish whether there was any significant difference in terms of the students’ experiences in the different learning contexts.
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