Now showing 1 - 10 of 66
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Fostering student motivation and engagement through teacher autonomy support: A self-determination theory perspective
    (International Journal of Instruction, 2024)
    Siacor Kimberly Hannah
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    In this study, we qualitatively explore how teachers perceive the usefulness of teacher autonomy support in fostering student motivation and engagement. Seven science and mathematics teachers from Singapore secondary schools were gathered for semi-structured interviews after implementing teacher autonomy support in their respective classrooms. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the interview data using the concepts pre-conceived from literature. The findings herein suggest that teachers perceived the usefulness of teacher autonomy support on student psychological needs satisfaction, and ultimately motivation and engagement (behavioural, emotional, cognitive). The findings have two implications: (1) teachers internalise the value of autonomy support in student motivation and engagement and (2) teachers perceive each autonomy-supportive strategy in a distinct manner, in terms of its contribution to dimensions of student engagement. It is then recommended for future teacher autonomy support workshop not only to teach the strategies, but also to highlight each strategy’s usefulness in different student and classroom situations.
      7  84
  • Publication
    Open Access
    From intrinsic motivation to passion in sport and exercise: A self-determination theory framework
    (2010) ; ;
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos
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    Lim, Carol Boon San
    Adolescence is a critical period in the study of physical activity (PA). Research evidence has shown that there is a decline in participation in P A in young people over their teenage years with ages 11 to 12 thought to be a critical age period at which PA begins to diminish. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between students' perceived autonomy support, behavioural regulations, and enjoyment in a physical education (PE) context, using a selfdetermination theory framework. Participants were 1854 secondary school students aged between 13 and 19 years from Singapore. Questionnaires were used to access perceived autonomy support, behavioural regulations, and enjoyment in PE. Results showed that perceived autonomy support predicted more self-determined forms of behavioural regulations in PE (intrinsic and identified) positively and negatively predicted more controlling forms of regulations (external and amotivation). Only intrinsic motivation positively predicted enjoyment. On the other hand, amotivation negatively predicted enjoyment. The findings highlight the importance of perceived autonomy support in fostering more self-determined forms of behavioural regulations and intrinsic motivation in school PE.
      208  265
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning for life, learning with fun: Igniting students’ intrinsic motivation to learn in the classroom
    (2015) ; ;
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos
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    Ryan, Richard M.
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    Lim, Coral Boon San
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    How, Yew Meng
      640  433
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Eportfolios in initial teacher education in Singapore: Methodological issues
    (2012-07) ;
    Zhou, Mingming
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    ; ;
    Chew, Evelyn
    Eportfolios were introduced into teacher education in the 1980s. Since then, educational researchers and practitioners have increasingly cited the use of portfolios as an important assessment and learning tool in teacher education programs. In the domain of teacher education, the need to improve quality, attain established standards and to resolve accreditation issues have led to the increased use of ePortfolios in many European states and others around the world (Granberg, 2010). An electronic portfolio (ePortfolio) is often defined as “a digitized collection of artifacts, including demonstrations, resources and accomplishments that represent an individual, group, community, organization, or institution. This collection can comprise of text-based, graphic or multimedia elements archived on a Web site or on other electronic media (Lorenzo & Ittelson, 2005, p. 3).” In pre-service teachers’ ePortfolios, artifacts can be samples of work that include lesson plans, stimulus materials, videos, pictures and picture files, classroom assignments, classroom tests, newsletters, and inservice materials produced by the pre-service teacher (Bruneau & Bie, 2010). With the creation of ePortfolios, student teachers can document their journey in becoming a teacher by selecting, sharing, and reflecting on artifacts such as educational philosophies, classroom management plans, unit and lesson plans, plans to meet the needs of diverse and special needs pupils, and video clips of practice teaching (e.g., Strudler & Wetzel, 2005). They can not only showcase their best work as a professional, but also exhibit the knowledge and skills in using technology.
      275  266
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Positive social climate for enhancing students' math self-concept: some research findings
    (2005)
    Lui, Elena Hah Wah
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    ; ;
    In Nov 2002, a research team in the National Institute of Education, NTU, launched a cross-discipline quasi-experimental study on “Positive Social Climate for Enhancing Students’ Math Self-concept”. Its main objective was to find the attributes (variables) in the social climate which are accountable for the increase of self-concept of Secondary Two students in the Math remedial classes in Singapore neighbourhood schools. Phase I of this study ( in 2003) was Instrumentation: validating the scales used in the measurement of treatment effect. H.W. Marsh’s Self-Description Questionnaire (SDQ-II, 1990), and B. Fraser’s “What Is Happening In This Class?” questionnaire (WIHIC) were validated together with the Motivational Orientation scale and Intellectual Achievement Responsibility (IAR) questionnaire. More than 700 Secondary Two students from four neighbourhood schools took part in this validating exercise. Phase II was Intervention`(in 2004): the teachers’ interactions with students, the enhancement of students’ capabilities and confidence. A training workshop for teachers in the experimental groups was conducted before the intervention. Two schools had the experimental groups and another two neighbourhood schools’ samples were held as the control groups of this study. Based on the results in Phase I, only two instruments: SDQII and WIHIC were selected to measure the effect of intervention. The total sample in this phase was close to 1000 Sec 2 students.
      128  226
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Computer mediated communication as a collaborative tool for facilitating student-centered learning in project- based classrooms
    (2005) ;
    Peer, Jarina
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    ; ;
    Williams, Michael Dale
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    Wong, Angela F. L.
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    Computer mediated communication (CMC) tools have marched into schools to provide borderless teaching and learning to complement existing face-to-face interactions. This article describes how teachers have used CMC to facilitate asynchronous online communication among students' collaborative project groups in project-based classrooms. Secondary school teachers used the CMC tool to facilitate and manage students' learning in terms of brainstorming and challenging student ideas, building resources, and working collaboratively to complete group projects.
      169  94
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Differences in daily step counts among primary, secondary, and junior college students
    The purpose of this study is to describe and analyse the physical activity patterns measured through pedometers among primary, secondary, and college students. A sample of 571 school children wore pedometers for 5 consecutive weekdays and one weekend day. Results showed that male students were more active than female students across all categories, except during co-curricular activity (CCAs). Primary school students were more active than secondary school and college students. Taken together, the findings of this study support the idea that, as children get older, the differences between boys and girls reduce drastically until the college level, at which point boys are equally as inactive as girls.
      373  287
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A longitudinal study of adolescents’ academic self-concept and their perceptions of home environment and classroom climate
    The 3-year longitudinal study of a single cohort (N = 495, average age 13) in Singapore used cluster analytic approach to identify trajectories of adolescents’ academic self concept and their perceptions of home environment and classroom climate. Four trajectories were identified. They were (1) steeply decreasing, (2) consistently low, (3) moderate and maintaining, and (4) consistently high. Higher-ability stream students were more likely than lower-ability stream students to be in the steeply decreasing group, while adolescents with better Secondary 1 and 2 class positions were more likely to be in the consistently high group. The results suggest that there are unique groups of adolescents in Singapore secondary schools. Some adolescents may have difficulties in adjusting to changes in adolescence; others may have struggled to cope long before they reach adolescence. Some adolescents may face minor ‘hiccups’ during adjustments while others may cope adequately on their own. As such, the notion of a single theory of adolescence may be too simplistic. Presumably, competing or conflicting theories of adolescence such as Hall’s (1904) ‘storm and stress’ theory and Rutter’s (1987) resiliency model may in fact all be relevant, albeit for different subgroups of youth.
      138  162