Now showing 1 - 10 of 47
  • Publication
    Open Access
      111  102
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Making bite-sized revision painless through the SymphoNIE app
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ;
      51  74
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Relationship between mindfulness and the propensity of individuals to experience flow
    The study examines the relationships between mindfulness and flow dispositions, through the investigation of differences in flow dispositions between groups of university athletes of distinctive mindfulness characteristics. Hollander's model of personality depicting psychological core, typical response and role-related behaviour is adopted as the theoretical framework (Hollander, 1967). 164 university athletes (69 women and 95 men, mean age = 22.4 years old, SD = 1.84) were clustered into three distinctive mindfulness groups based on their responses on the Mindfulness/Mindlessness Scale (MMS; Bodner & Langer, 2001). Three distinctive clusters formed using Ward's method (Ward, 1963) were as follows : High Mindfulness Group (n = 40), Moderate Mindfulness Group (n = 63), and Low Mindfulness Group (n = 61). High Mindfulness Group is characterised by higher novelty seeking, novelty producing, flexibility, and moderate engagement. Members of the Moderate Mindfulness Group displays moderate novelty seeking, novelty producing, flexibility, and high engagement. Low Mindfulness Group exudes lower in all the four mindfulness characteristics. Significant differences between the High Mindfulness Group and Low Mindfulness Group were found for six out of nine flow dispositions (p < .05) assessed using Flow Disposition Scale -2 (DFS-2, Jackson & Eklund, 2004). Those in the High Mindfulness Group scored significantly higher in balance of skill/challenge, merging of action and awareness, goals, concentration, loss of self-consciousness, and autotelic experience scores compared to the Low Mindfulness Group. The findings suggest that mindfulness characteristics is related to flow dispositions.
      269  30
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Explainer videos for blended learning
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2017)
      51  42
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Physical education pedagogy senses a change
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2018) ;
      50  62
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Mindfulness, movement control, and attentional focus strategies: Effects of mindfulness on a postural balance task
    (2012) ;
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos
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    ; ;
    Chen, Lung Hung
    We examined whether the momentary induction of state mindfulness benefited subsequent balance performance, taking into consideration the effects of dispositional mindfulness. We also tested whether our mindfulness induction, grounded in sustaining moment-to-moment attention, influenced the attentional focus strategies that were adopted by the participants during the balancing task. Balance performance was ascertained based on approximate entropy(ApEn) of the center of pressure (COP) data. The study involved 32 males (age: M = 22.8, SD= 1.94) who were randomly assigned to the mindfulness or control group. Using difference in pretest to posttest performance based on the medio-lateral movements as the dependent variable, the test for interaction showed that the mindfulness induction was more effective for participants with higher dispositional mindfulness. Participants who underwent mindfulness induction also reported greater use of external focus strategies than those in the control group. Results suggest that momentary mindful attention could benefit balance performance and affect the use of attentional focus strategies during movement control.
      755  2285
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Problematic mobile phone use among youth athletes: A topic modelling approach
    (2022)
    Ong, Nathanael Chong Hao
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    ;
    Jeevita S. Pillai
    ;
    Lim, Harry Ban Teck
    ;
    Chua, Joshua H. E.
    The study provided an exploratory investigation into problematic mobile phone use among youth athletes. The study aimed to identify the factors contributing to problematic use and effects of problematic use among youth athletes. 369 Singaporean youth athletes, aged between 12 and 19 years old, participated in the study. A structural topic modelling approach using the R package stm was used to analyse the data. The process generated a list of topics for each of the open-ended survey questions. Subsequent interpretation was done to label the topics and group them into higher thematic categories. The prevalence of problematic mobile phone use in the sampled population was 40.65%. The analysis produced 38 topics for factors and 36 topics for effects. For factors, the higher thematic categories were habitual/compulsive use, accessibility/utility, alleviation of boredom/moods, lack of control, coping with school/work, entertainment, and communication. For effects, the higher thematic categories were time wastage/insufficient time, distraction/loss of focus, sleep/tiredness, sport-related areas, and addiction. The study provided novel insight into issues surrounding problematic mobile phone use among youth athletes. Future research needs to be conducted to further investigate the topics and themes that emerged.
    WOS© Citations 1  316  99
  • Publication
    Open Access
      129  96
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Motivations for volunteering and its associations with time perspectives and life satisfaction: A latent profile approach
    (2018) ;
    Li, Chunxiao
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    ;
    Muhammad Idzhar Kailani
    This study aims to examine motivation for volunteering and its association with time perspective and life satisfaction among volunteers (n = 221). Latent profile analysis was used to profile individuals based on their time perspectives, and then to compare group differences in life satisfaction and volunteering motivation. Three profiles were identified. Profile 1 (n = 32; 14.5%) was a “balanced time perspective group”, Profile 2 (n = 102; 46.2%) was a “maladaptive group”, and Profile 3 (n = 87; 39.3%) was a “nonchalant group”. Profile 1 showed the highest life satisfaction compared to the two remaining groups. Significant group differences in volunteering motivation between this group and the other two were also reported. These findings suggest that time perspective may be appropriate for understanding motivation for voluntarism and life satisfaction.
    WOS© Citations 10Scopus© Citations 13  124  229
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The use of information communication and technologies tools to maximise students' learning in physical education in Singapore schools
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ; ;
    Camire, Martin
    With the Ministry of Education’s (MOE) focus on using ICT in resourceful and innovative ways to improve teaching and learning (MOE, 2014), PE teachers should be trained and equipped with strategies to create environments where students are given more autonomy to decide ‘what’ to learn and ‘how’ to learn, according to students’ ability to use Information Communication and Technologies (ICT). For example, making available e-learning materials related to the lesson before and after the class affords students opportunities to learn more readily on their own than when these materials are absent. Using video recording to provide visual and verbal feedback from the teacher or among peers for skill performance during a lesson is just one of many ways ICT can be used to maximise students’ learning and develop the affective, psychomotor, and cognitive domains set out in the PE syllabus. The advantages of providing students with opportunities to harness ICT can be directly beneficial for skills acquisition and indirectly for honing life skills.
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